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Re: [TSL] Argonaut 1866
Susan Swiggum <swig@ns.sympatico.ca> on 09/22/2013

Hi Judy,

Not the same vessel.   This is the information about the ARGONAUT from 
Christiania (Oslo), Norway

Reel Number    Ship Name    Departure Information    Arrival 
Information    Shipping Line    Special Group(s)    Remarks
C-4521    ARGONAUT    Christiania, Norway 1866-04-25    Quebec, Que. 
1866-06-05    (BL) Beling & Lamotte (agent)        List Number: 27 ; 
ship, Captain Plade Stranger ; two births ; an infant died of debility ; 
one woman incised wound of knee

 From Norway Heritage website ..

> The ship 
> <http://www.norwayheritage.com/articles/templates/ships.asp?articleid=22&zoneid=5> 
> Argonaut was built by Sam. Lapham in Medford, Mass. USA in 1849. She 
> had a tonnage of 305 Norwegian Commercial lasts 
> <http://www.norwayheritage.com/articles/templates/ships.asp?articleid=22&zoneid=5>. 
> Her length was 147,5 feet and beam 29 feet, depth of 11 feet. She was 
> rebuilt in 1874. Owned by Ludvigsen & Scheldrup in Christiania from 
> 1864. Argonaut sailed from Norway to Quebec with emigrants 1866 - 1870.
> "Kommerselester" or "*Commercial lasts*", is a measurement for the 
> inside volume of the ship. It was recognized as the ships burthen or 
> *burden*. 1 Norwegian Commercial last = 2,08 register *ton* = 165 Cu 
> ft of cut board or I30 cu,ft of round timber. 

The ARGONAUT, Captain H. Steengrafe, which arrived at New York August 03 
1866 from Bremen, was actually a bark (barque) of 752 tons burthen.   
Same vessel, same Captain made an earlier voyage from Bremen in 1866, 
arriving at New York April 04 1866.

Germans did sail sometimes from Norwegian ports too, but they would 
usually travel to those ports by 'feeder-ship."   If the information you 
read about emigrants and transatlantic passage on sailing ships, was 
from Norway Heritage website    http://www.norwayheritage.com/   then 
you can rely on the details you read as the experience for Germans / 
Bavarians would have been the same / very similar ;  all Norway Heritage 
information is well researched.

Sue
-- 
TheShipsList Website
http://www.theshipslist.com/



On 9/22/2013 3:50 PM,  Judy Weber wrote:
>       Our ancestor's sister, cousin, and step-father arrived in New York, 3
> Aug, 1866, aboard the ship Argonaut, according to Germans to America. The
> ship had sailed from Bremen several weeks earlier. I have not found this
> voyage's manifest transcribed on the Internet. However, I found an Argonaut
> described on an  earlier 1866 voyage from Christiana to Quebec with details
> of travel at that time. Would both of these voyages be the same ship
> Argonaut? Could our ship Argonaut that left Bremen actually have been
> continuing  a journey that had begun in Norway? I found the details of
> travel at that time very interesting. Is it incorrect to assume that details
> of ship travel that applied to Norwegians would also apply to Bavarians?
>
> Judy W.
>    

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